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{"id":1644323733547,"title":"Authentic Boruca Mask from Costa Rica - CATO - FREE SHIPPING","handle":"authentic-boruca-mask-from-costa-rica-cato-free-shipping","description":"\u003ch2\u003eFREE SHIPPING.  This mask was brought back from Boruca by me.  The height of the mask is 18 inches and it is 8 inches wide.\u003c\/h2\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Boruca Tribe is estimated to have about 2660 members and is located deep in the Talamanca Mountains of Costa Rica on an indigenous reserve, where about 140km of land is protected for their use. The ancestors of the modern Boruca made up a group of chiefdoms that ruled most of Costa Rica's Pacific coast Like their ancestors, the Boruca are known for their arts and craftwork, especially their weaving and distinctive colorfully painted balsa wood masks.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThese masks are carved and painted by hand and are the main livelihood of many of the Boruca people. Masks generally fall into three categories: a representation of the devil, the ecological devil, and a depiction of ecological scenery. The masks portraying the devil are the most relevant to Brunca culture—although they may seem frightening or sinister to an outsider, the Brunca view these masks as a symbol of wellbeing and believe that they serve as protection from evil spirits. Similarly, in some ecological masks, the devil is portrayed in combination with nature; the devil represents the protection of the ecological system, particularly the animals surrounding the village.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe ecological masks cater more toward tourists and typically feature landscapes, plants, and animals. Mask making has traditionally been a male trade; however, the process often includes both sexes—men carving and women painting. Recently, women have entered into the mask carving trade: as of 2010 there are approximately five women in the community carving masks. These masks are important elements in the Boruca’s annual Danza de los Diablitos ceremony, celebrated every winter since at least early Colonial times. The Danza depicts the resitance of the “Diablito”, the Boruca people, against the incursion of Spanish conquistadors.\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2018-12-18T22:11:08-05:00","created_at":"2018-12-18T22:25:56-05:00","vendor":"Camaj Fiber Arts","type":"","tags":[],"price":22500,"price_min":22500,"price_max":22500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":15143007125547,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Authentic Boruca Mask from Costa Rica - CATO - FREE SHIPPING","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":22500,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2668\/4080\/products\/Cato_2.jpg?v=1545190116","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2668\/4080\/products\/Cato_1.jpg?v=1545190116","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2668\/4080\/products\/Cato_3.jpg?v=1545190116","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2668\/4080\/products\/Cato_4.jpg?v=1545190116","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2668\/4080\/products\/Cato_5.jpg?v=1545190116"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/2668\/4080\/products\/Cato_2.jpg?v=1545190116","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003ch2\u003eFREE SHIPPING.  This mask was brought back from Boruca by me.  The height of the mask is 18 inches and it is 8 inches wide.\u003c\/h2\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe Boruca Tribe is estimated to have about 2660 members and is located deep in the Talamanca Mountains of Costa Rica on an indigenous reserve, where about 140km of land is protected for their use. The ancestors of the modern Boruca made up a group of chiefdoms that ruled most of Costa Rica's Pacific coast Like their ancestors, the Boruca are known for their arts and craftwork, especially their weaving and distinctive colorfully painted balsa wood masks.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThese masks are carved and painted by hand and are the main livelihood of many of the Boruca people. Masks generally fall into three categories: a representation of the devil, the ecological devil, and a depiction of ecological scenery. The masks portraying the devil are the most relevant to Brunca culture—although they may seem frightening or sinister to an outsider, the Brunca view these masks as a symbol of wellbeing and believe that they serve as protection from evil spirits. Similarly, in some ecological masks, the devil is portrayed in combination with nature; the devil represents the protection of the ecological system, particularly the animals surrounding the village.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe ecological masks cater more toward tourists and typically feature landscapes, plants, and animals. Mask making has traditionally been a male trade; however, the process often includes both sexes—men carving and women painting. Recently, women have entered into the mask carving trade: as of 2010 there are approximately five women in the community carving masks. These masks are important elements in the Boruca’s annual Danza de los Diablitos ceremony, celebrated every winter since at least early Colonial times. The Danza depicts the resitance of the “Diablito”, the Boruca people, against the incursion of Spanish conquistadors.\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Authentic Boruca Mask from Costa Rica - CATO - FREE SHIPPING

Product Description

FREE SHIPPING.  This mask was brought back from Boruca by me.  The height of the mask is 18 inches and it is 8 inches wide.

The Boruca Tribe is estimated to have about 2660 members and is located deep in the Talamanca Mountains of Costa Rica on an indigenous reserve, where about 140km of land is protected for their use. The ancestors of the modern Boruca made up a group of chiefdoms that ruled most of Costa Rica's Pacific coast Like their ancestors, the Boruca are known for their arts and craftwork, especially their weaving and distinctive colorfully painted balsa wood masks.

These masks are carved and painted by hand and are the main livelihood of many of the Boruca people. Masks generally fall into three categories: a representation of the devil, the ecological devil, and a depiction of ecological scenery. The masks portraying the devil are the most relevant to Brunca culture—although they may seem frightening or sinister to an outsider, the Brunca view these masks as a symbol of wellbeing and believe that they serve as protection from evil spirits. Similarly, in some ecological masks, the devil is portrayed in combination with nature; the devil represents the protection of the ecological system, particularly the animals surrounding the village.

The ecological masks cater more toward tourists and typically feature landscapes, plants, and animals. Mask making has traditionally been a male trade; however, the process often includes both sexes—men carving and women painting. Recently, women have entered into the mask carving trade: as of 2010 there are approximately five women in the community carving masks. These masks are important elements in the Boruca’s annual Danza de los Diablitos ceremony, celebrated every winter since at least early Colonial times. The Danza depicts the resitance of the “Diablito”, the Boruca people, against the incursion of Spanish conquistadors.

$225.00
Maximum quantity available reached.